The ageless fairy-tale story of Susan Boyle

Susan Boyle, Britain's Got Talent's finalist, proves that we're never too old to have a dream, never too old to pursue it.

Susan Boyle, Britain's Got Talent's finalist, proves that we're never too old to have a dream, never too old to pursue it.

I dreamed a dream –

The ageless fairy-tale story of Susan Boyle

 

Who hasn’t heard of Susan Boyle, the “older” woman with the angelic voice who inspired the world? She stood before the Britain’s Got Talent judges, enduring their eye-rolling and other visible expressions of dismissal. Patient and gracious, she answered their questions, revealing her age (good grief, 47!), the fact she’d never been given a chance with her singing, and most of all her dream, to sing with the likes of Elaine Paige, a famous English singer. That brought another round of cruel eye-rolls from judges and the audience as well.

Then she sang, and the rest truly is history. Her rendition of I Dreamed a Dream from Les Miserables gave me goosebumps, and I didn’t hear it live – like hundreds of millions of other people, I saw this remarkable audition on YouTube.

 

I needed to hear more. I listened to her Cry Me a River, and I saw her second performance on Britain’s Got Talent when she sang Memories, from Cats, one of my lifetime favorite songs. More goosebumps. Her voice is, quite simply, fantastic, but it’s also her interpretation of the songs, the life and passion she gives them. She delivers, and she delivers with a straightforward honesty I’d almost forgotten.

Contrast her performance with the current video pop star kings and divas. Always aware of where the camera is, they “act” their way through songs, delivering carefully rehearsed expressions and movements meant to convince you that their songs are filled with the passion of the lyrics and essence of the song.

Not so with Boyle. She simply sings.

In addition to her unaffected delivery and her angelic voice, she represents hope for women “of a certain age,” for people who have lost the golden glow of youth but have been touched by the rich silver of wisdom and life experience. It’s a tale as old as time itself, embraced more passionately in the United States than anywhere else in the world: Cinderella. Rags to Riches. Rocky Balboa, from downtrodden to triumphant.

Susan Boyle touches all people who have hope in their hearts, all people who have a dream. She demonstrates, with an abundance of grace and patience, that people of all AGES can have a dream. We don’t have to possess decades and decades of a future to strive for something new and wonderful in our lives. We can be over 40, over 60, over 80 – it’s not the age, but the passion in our hearts that counts.

Boyle is exceptional. Youngest of four brothers and six sisters, she never left home. She stayed long after her siblings left, sacrificing her own pursuits by taking care of her 91-year-old mother until her death in 2007. She believed in her dream – learned from a voice coach, attended Edinburgh Acting School, and spent her entire savings to produce a professional demo tape which she distributed to record companies, radio talent competition and local and national TV. She endured such mocking in 1995 at a local talent competition called My Kind of People that she almost backed out of her audition with Britain’s Got Talent.

She came this close to not doing it. She was too old. Not pretty enough. Had tried and tried and failed. Why subject herself to more public humiliation?

Her mother believed in her, that’s why. When it came down to something balancing on those scales we use to make our decisions, her mother’s faith in her, her mother’s urging her to try Britain’s Got Talent, tipped the scales and made her keep that audition date.

There are many fascinating aspects of Susan Boyle’s meteoric rise to fame. From the aspect of age, she gives a precious gift to us, a message. A reminder.

You’re never to old to dream.

Go for it.

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2 responses to “The ageless fairy-tale story of Susan Boyle

  1. I loved your posting “She came this close to not doing it. She was too old. Not pretty enough. Had tried and tried and failed. Why subject herself to more public humiliation?

    Her mother believed in her, that’s why” makes me cry. Thanks for making my day. I look forward to your other postings. Lori

  2. Thank you, Lori. Susan’s devotion to her mother, and her mother’s belief in Susan, both are such precious gifts. We give such a gift when we believe in our loved one’s dreams, and they give such a gift to us when they support our fondest hopes.

    I’m glad Susan’s story inspired you. She certainly inspired me! Best wishes pursuing *your* dream, Lori! –Janet

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